Monday, July 29, 2013

Stanford Medical School Teaches Genomics


Stanford University School of Medicine is researching the most effective methods to teach fundamental genomics. It turns out that one activity that boosts mastery of course content by 31% is something many of you have done already. It was to test their own genome and use the results in the course. This result was published June 23rd week in an article entitled "Evidence That Personal Genome Testing Enhances Student Learning in a Course on Genomics and Personalized Medicine". The abstract said in part:


An emerging debate in academic medical centers is not about the need for providing trainees with fundamental education on genomics, but rather the most effective educational models that should be deployed. 
We hypothesized that use of personal genome testing in the classroom would enhance the learning experience of students.
Undergoing personal genome testing and using personal genotype data in the classroom enhanced students' self-reported and assessed knowledge of genomics, and did not appear to cause significant anxiety.

Just three years ago it was reported in Inside Stanford Medicine that:


The question of whether to offer personal genotyping to students has undergone a yearlong, vigorous debate by a medical school task force.... Although not all task force members favored such a class, a majority recommended its adoption. School officials agreed. 

This is a positive step forward in bringing the future physicians into the age of personalized genomic medicine.

The question of whether to offer personal genotyping to students has undergone a yearlong, vigorous debate by a medical school task force, with course organizers addressing concerns that were raised by members of the group. - See more at: http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2010/june/genotype.html#sthash.fVAKPxLz.dpuf

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The question of whether to offer personal genotyping to students has undergone a yearlong, vigorous debate by a medical school task force, with course organizers addressing concerns that were raised by members of the group. Although not all task force members favored such a class, a majority recommended its adoption. School officials agreed that the course should be offered, given the numerous safeguards built into the curriculum by the organizers. - See more at: http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2010/june/genotype.html#sthash.fVAKPxLz.dpuf
The question of whether to offer personal genotyping to students has undergone a yearlong, vigorous debate by a medical school task force, with course organizers addressing concerns that were raised by members of the group. Although not all task force members favored such a class, a majority recommended its adoption. School officials agreed that the course should be offered, given the numerous safeguards built into the curriculum by the organizers. - See more at: http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2010/june/genotype.html#sthash.fVAKPxLz.dpuf
The question of whether to offer personal genotyping to students has undergone a yearlong, vigorous debate by a medical school task force, with course organizers addressing concerns that were raised by members of the group. Although not all task force members favored such a class, a majority recommended its adoption. School officials agreed that the course should be offered, given the numerous safeguards built into the curriculum by the organizers. - See more at: http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2010/june/genotype.html#sthash.fVAKPxLz.dpuf

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